Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

26 May 2016
Author :  

 Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer.

 If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future.
The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive an average of less than two years, even after treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the study authors said.
"We've had luck with other types of cancer in removing the brakes on the immune system to allow it to fight the tumors, but this has not been the case with glioblastoma," said study author Dr. Anhua Wu, of First Hospital of China Medical University in Shenyang, China.
"If our discovery of these genes is validated in other studies, we could use this 'gene signature' to determine the best treatments or path of treatment," Wu explained in a news release.
The investigators looked at tissue samples from 127 people with glioblastoma. They also looked at tissue samples from 170 people with a less aggressive type of brain tumor.
This led to the discovery of eight immune genes that play a role in glioblastoma. Three of the genes protect against glioblastoma. Five of the genes increase the risk of early death in patients with glioblastoma, the researchers said.
Wu and colleagues then looked at more than 500 samples from another group of people with glioblastoma. These samples revealed the same eight genes, the study authors noted.
The report was published online May 25 in the journal Neurology.
Dr. Rifaat Bashir, a retired neurologist in Reston, Va., wrote an editorial accompanying the study. "The looming question in brain cancer research today is whether the launch of immunotherapy will help control an uncontrollable disease," Bashir said in the journal news release.
"While this study does not answer this question, it brings us one step closer to believing that one day we will be able to exploit the immune system to better treat glioblastoma," Bashir noted.

More information
The American Association of Neurological Surgeons has more on glioblastoma

 

1277 Views
Super User

Suspendisse at libero porttitor nisi aliquet vulputate vitae at velit. Aliquam eget arcu magna, vel congue dui. Nunc auctor mauris tempor leo aliquam vel porta ante sodales. Nulla facilisi. In accumsan mattis odio vel luctus.

Comment

  • Super User Super User Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Enter your message here

  • Super User Super User Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Enter your message here

  • Super User Super User Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Enter your message here

  • Super User Super User Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Enter your message here

  • Super User Super User Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Enter your message here

  • Alex Nguyen Alex Nguyen Thursday, 26 May 2016

    Forem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque convallis ligula eget tellus lacinia tristique. Vivamus convallis tristique fringilla. Pellentesque pharetra, lacus tincidunt pulvinar facilisis

Login to post comments

Usage:

JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use Google Maps.
However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser.
To view Google Maps, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options, and then try again.

Print
We use cookies to improve our website. Cookies used for the essential operation of this site have already been set. For more information visit our Cookie policy. I accept cookies from this site.Agree